Change: it’s one of the few constants in your life – and your career.

Whether you’ve recently changed employers, switched departments or taken a promotion within your food & beverage organization, your first 90 days sets the tone for your future success.

And more than likely, your new role will bring with it a whole host of changes: new responsibilities, new co-workers, new management, new products…and more!

What should you do – and avoid doing – to manage these changes, make a great impression and maintain career momentum? Kinsa shares 7 secrets to success in your new role:

  1. Assess your vulnerabilities. Like it or not, what made you successful in your last role will not automatically guarantee success in your new one. As you learn the requirements of the position, make a list of your strengths and weaknesses. Then, be sure to create an action plan that closes your skill gaps and minimizes areas of vulnerability.
  2. Get to know your team. Do your best to quickly learn everyone’s name. Gradually build relationships by asking neutral questions about work and/or outside interests (avoid getting too personal too quickly). Attend after-work social events or participate in volunteer opportunities to get to know your team better.
  3. Adapt to your manager’s style and idiosyncrasies. When you’re new in a position, you shouldn’t try to change your boss. For the first few months, establish rapport and trust by prioritizing activities the way your boss does. Use his preferred communication channels and follow his lead. If you do have concerns or disagreements, make a list that you can tactfully discuss at your first review.
  4. Get a read on the culture. Take mental notes on how team members interact. Find out who the most successful professionals are, and take your cues from them. By simply observing, you can learn a lot about how the organization operates. In just a few days’ time, you should be able to identify key influencers and allies, potential threats to your success, and the best ways for you to gel with teammates.
  5. Foster strategic relationships. Once you know “who’s who,” start strengthening relationships with individuals who may be able to introduce you up within the organization, or serve as a mentor. Be careful, however, not to cross the line and appear like a self-serving “angler” whose sole interest is to get ahead. Offer your help and do little things that make colleagues and your boss look good.
  6. Show what you know – but don’t be a know-it-all. To position yourself for long-term success (and not be viewed as a potential threat), make sure you share your expertise and insight the right way. Use these tips to prove your work ethic and expertise, without going too far:
    • Be inclusive: when you’re given credit for a job well done; when you’re communicating via email; and when you’re gathering input from others.
    • Find an ally in your department who can help you “learn the ropes” internally.
    • Focus on your core responsibilities for the first few months, saving “reach” projects for after your first review.
  7. Develop 30, 60 and 90 day goals. Once you’ve assessed yourself and your current situation, work with your boss to create SMART short-term goals that:
    • provide a daily road map for your work;
    • allow you to demonstrate immediate, measurable success on the job;
    • position yourself for continued growth.
    • Note: When you outline short-term objectives, be mindful of the implications your plans may have on other employees. Specifically, be careful not to step on co-workers’ toes to get where you want to be – doing so will only undermine fledgling professional relationships.

Searching for your next great food & beverage opportunity?

Trust Kinsa to match you with the ideal position. We will simplify your job search and help you build your career, by providing the opportunity, expertise and support you need. Connect with Kinsa today or search food & beverage executive and professional jobs here.

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